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Steve's dog food

Steve's dog food

Steve's dog food, that is. I think I read on a blog somewhere that you can substitute canned for kibble, which is what he was feeding him and was also the only type of dog food she ate.

A lot of dog foods contn fillers, which are not so great for them. I was worried about her but she did great. (She also got a raw diet, and it worked great.)

Another option would be to get a pet store that sells kibble that is made without anything unnecessary, like fillers and stuff. They may not have everything you want, but the more "pure" stuff they sell, the better. I did this for my pup and she's pretty happy with the results.

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I was really worried about my pup (8-year old Bichon Frise) being diagnosed with an anal gland blockage because of me not reading the label closely enough. He eats a small raw diet with no wheat products and I fed him kibble for a few weeks and he was fine. After a few weeks of doing that, he got the anal gland blockage.

We fed him his natural and he was fine. We switched back to the kibble and he got it agn.

I did a LOT of research about diet and I realized that the kibble was the problem. After several months on a "pure" raw diet, he no longer had it.

This could have happened to us because I don't read all the labels when I buy dog food. The problem is that if I didn't keep up with him, he would have gotten the blockage that is almost unheard of for a healthy dog. The blockage is due to the bacteria in the colon not being able to digest a type of protein found in a raw diet. Raw is just way, way better than most kibble.

Just a friendly heads up so that other people don't have to go through the heartache that we went through.

There's also the problem with not reading a label and not being able to properly gauge how much your dog needs. For example, we used to give our dog a cup of dry food and a few tablespoons of canned food, but she would only eat half of the dry and none of the canned. So we went to feeding her a 1 cup of dry, 1 cup of canned. Then she stopped eating the canned and started getting fat agn. I read somewhere that you can get away with that with a dog, but I don't think so, even though I know that it's true for cats.

The problem is that if I didn't keep up with him, he would have gotten the blockage that is almost unheard of for a healthy dog. The blockage is due to the bacteria in the colon not being able to digest a type of protein found in a raw diet. Raw is just way, way better than most kibble.

The problem is that if I didn't keep up with him, he would have gotten the blockage that is almost unheard of for a healthy dog. The blockage is due to the bacteria in the colon not being able to digest a type of protein found in a raw diet. Raw is just way, way better than most kibble.

I wouldn't want that. I hope I never have to go through that.

Thanks for posting, I'm glad I'm not the only one with a dog that gets a bit unwell with this stuff.

I was reading up a bit on colon stuff yesterday and there seems to be a lot of variation between dogs and how they react to it. I'm hoping that some day my dog will be as healthy as him, but if she starts developing blockages agn, we'll be well prepared.

I hope she never gets the kind of blockage that would need a lot of hospitalisation and a long term course of antibiotics... that's what I want to avoid.

Haven't had any recent issues. I do have to be more careful and not let her eat too quickly, especially when it's a mealtime, especially if it's a big bone. I've had some things happen, like her chewing the tip off and the inside of a large bone. I had to use a little butter, and after a little bit she got all the bone out and ate the rest, but it was a big mess. That was a few months ago, so I haven't seen any issues since. I guess it was because she's been eating well lately.

I know, I know...

I know I'm not perfect and I'm not good at being the 'good dog' and I sometimes have to remind myself to do that too.

I would think it's the most dangerous one in general to have the problem with, because once she has a blockage she needs to have some sort of surgery or something to make sure she gets it all out. I remember reading about people getting it as puppies and then growing up with it and having the blockage all their lives, not being able to get it out without surgery. It's good that you're doing everything you can to help her before it gets to that point, even just being more mindful of it. Thanks for sharing that too... it's the sort of thing that I could never imagine it happening to me. You are definitely doing things right.

Thank you so much! I'm always thinking about that, but since I've never had it happen, I have no basis for comparison.

I hope your pup grows up to be healthy and have lots of good years!

This is a great thread to be reading about stuff like this. I've actually had to see my vet (and a second one after that, lol) about an intermittent problem with my dog, who has been my baby for 15 years now. The first time it happened, my first thought was "oh, she's just going to pee once and die" (or something to that effect, it was a while ago), but a couple years later it happened agn. And then agn. And then agn. I was so scared that she'd develop other problems. She never showed any signs of it, though. But I guess I should have figured it out because she always had a lot of urine coming out even when she wasn't having a problem. I had to have her put on a urinary bladder stent (she would pee on her own though, she wasn't incontinent) and we've had to adjust her diet a bit since then. I guess I was thinking of her being incontinent.

Your post was good, because it explned a lot to me. I'll never know if she'd have a problem later on if it wasn't taken care of early on. But she has had good years since then, so it seems like there was nothing to worry about.

It sounds like she has issues with her bladder. I had a dog like that once, although I haven't been able to find anything out about how to fix it. The most common problem with that sort of thing is the bladder gets infected, and they will be incontinent for the rest of their lives if it isn't taken care of. When I had to have that done on one of our dogs, it was pretty much a death sentence.

I just wanted to comment on how wonderful it was to see your puppy on a bike! A few weeks ago, my brother and I took out a rescue puppy named Sam. He's four months old and we absolutely love him! We got him from a great breeder who rsed him in the basement of


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