General

Can drug dogs smell acid

Can drug dogs smell acid

Can drug dogs smell acid?

By Lorna Marsala, CNN

Updated 9:43 PM ET, Tue August 27, 2014

Photos: The dogs of war

The German Shepherd was created by crossing a German Spitz with a Saluki. (Getty Images)

Hide Caption

1 of 14

Photos: The dogs of war

Rough Collies have an alerting nose. This collie has a sense of smell so acute that it can detect cancer.

Hide Caption

2 of 14

Photos: The dogs of war

The Afghan Hound is a descendant of the original scent hounds. This dog is trned in the United States.

Hide Caption

3 of 14

Photos: The dogs of war

The Hungarian Pointer has been used to hunt wild boar and deer in Hungary and Germany since the 1930s.

Hide Caption

4 of 14

Photos: The dogs of war

The Belgian Malinois is a versatile dog. It is used for police work, as a military dog and as a service dog.

Hide Caption

5 of 14

Photos: The dogs of war

The Afghan Hound was created by crossing a German Spitz with a Saluki. This dog has a sense of smell so acute that it can detect cancer.

Hide Caption

6 of 14

Photos: The dogs of war

The Saluki is a cousin of the Australian Cattle Dog.

Hide Caption

7 of 14

Photos: The dogs of war

This Malinois is trned in the United States.

Hide Caption

8 of 14

Photos: The dogs of war

This hound has been used to hunt wild boar and deer in Hungary and Germany since the 1930s.

Hide Caption

9 of 14

Photos: The dogs of war

The Belgian Malinois is a versatile dog. It is used for police work, as a military dog and as a service dog.

Hide Caption

10 of 14

Photos: The dogs of war

This Malinois is trned in the United States.

Hide Caption

11 of 14

Photos: The dogs of war

This hound has been used to hunt wild boar and deer in Hungary and Germany since the 1930s.

Hide Caption

12 of 14

Photos: The dogs of war

The Belgian Malinois is a versatile dog. It is used for police work, as a military dog and as a service dog.

Hide Caption

13 of 14

Photos: The dogs of war

This Belgian Malinois is trned in the United States.

Hide Caption

14 of 14

Story highlights

Lorna Marsala: The odor of urine is a deterrent to dog attacks

She says dogs are attracted to people they consider alpha in the pack hierarchy

She says this applies in the wild and at home

Marsala: The best way to keep your dog out of the grass is to keep her in

A dog is like any other animal, he has a sense of smell, which is why you can detect something is amiss by the smell of urine or poop, and he's interested in what you do, where you go and whom you are with.

We humans are creatures of habit, and if we are traveling we may leave our house early so we can be in our destination and on the road by a certn time.

We also have a home routine that we stick to. If we are cooking in the kitchen, we cook in the kitchen. If we are watching TV or reading, we do it in the den. If we are in the den, we sit on the couch or go to the table and sit at the kitchen table.

Dogs are no different. If you see the alpha in the pack and the pack is hungry and tired, then chances are they will go in that direction.

I've read where people say that you should have an outdoor dog and an indoor dog. I say you should have a doggone good dog, and you should do your best to make your dog's life pleasant, healthy and happy. If that includes putting your dog out in the yard, then that's fine. If you don't feel that's a good option, then have an indoor dog.

Lorna Marsala is a dog behaviorist and the author of "The Dog Lover's Guide to Dog Behavior." She has written for "People" magazine and is a syndicated columnist. The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely hers.

(CNN)I've read where people say that you should have an outdoor dog and an indoor dog. I say you should have a doggone good dog, and you should do your best to make your dog's life pleasant, healthy and happy. If that includes putting your dog out in the yard, then that's fine. If you don't feel that's a good option, then have an indoor dog.

So I am going to tell you what I think might have gone down on my last camping trip. You know what they say: "When in doubt, blame the dog." That's what I'm going to do.

On the way up to my destination, a place in the hills, we passed a house with a nice yard and a nice dog, and I was thinking how great it would be to have my own dog out on a camping trip. I would be able to take her with me for the first time. This dog would be with me on the trl. This dog would know all the woods, all the lakes, all the streams, all the trls, so that I would know where to go when we came to a new place.

On the way down, we passed a house with a nice yard and a nice dog. The owner was on the porch, sitting on a bench and watching his dog, which he described to me as having a good personality. She was a big German Shepherd and, I thought, just a great dog. I would love