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Splenic mass in dogs

Splenic mass in dogs

Splenic mass in dogs: a retrospective study.

The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the clinical, laboratory and histopathologic findings, diagnosis, treatment and outcome of dogs with splenic mass. Medical records of 64 dogs with splenic mass were reviewed for age, signalment, history, clinical signs, abdominal ultrasound (US) results, concurrent diseases and results of blood analysis. The dogs were classified into three groups: lymphoma, leukemias and non-neoplastic mass. There were 32 dogs with non-neoplastic mass (20 males and 12 females). The mean age was 11.9 years (range: 6-16 years). The most frequent clinical signs were lethargy, anorexia, weight loss, lymphadenopathy, vomiting, and diarrhoea. There was no significant difference between males and females. The median serum LDH, total bilirubin and urea nitrogen concentrations and uric acid levels were significantly higher, but creatinine and blood glucose concentrations were significantly lower in dogs with splenic lymphoma compared with dogs with splenic mass of other aetiologies (P<,0.01). Dogs with splenic mass of lymphoid origin were treated with prednisolone and cyclosporin, alone or in combination. The histopathology and immunohistochemistry confirmed the diagnosis of lymphoma. Complete remission was observed in all dogs and complete remission of disease was evident in 90% of the dogs with lymphoma after a median duration of 20 weeks. There was no recurrence of lymphoma in any dog. Our results indicate that canine splenic lymphoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of dogs with splenic mass and that surgical biopsy and histopathology are important for definitive diagnosis. Lymphoma should be considered as a differential diagnosis for dogs with splenic mass because it may have a favourable response to treatment with prednisolone and cyclosporin.


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